| By Qi Traditions

HOW TO ADAPT: 12 STRESS-FREE STRATEGIES

Stress is a normal part of life. Stress is the body's way of responding to a stressor or an event that’s threatening, challenging, and difficult. It can lead to anxiety and depression, which in turn can cause more stress.

According to the World Health Organization, "evidence suggests that people under chronic stress are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease." Stress also increases blood pressure levels, making individuals susceptible to heart attack or stroke.

Stress can be caused by deadlines at work, financial troubles, children with behavioural issues or difficult personalities to deal with. It could also stem from a person's lack of self-confidence due to external factors such as their weight or appearance. Some people are naturally more stress-prone than others while some events in life may cause an individual to become more sensitive to stress.

We can't always avoid stressors, but we can adapt to them in healthy and productive ways! In this blog post, you'll learn how to adapt to stress using 12 strategies that are both effective and easy to implement.

1. Identify your triggers

Figure out what is causing stress for you. Is it a work project? A family member's health issue? An argument with your significant other or friend? Write down the things that trigger stress in your life and see if there are patterns, such as certain days of the week, parts of town where you live, or specific people.

Consider what you can do to lessen the stress of your triggers. For instance, if a particular person stresses you out, avoid spending time with them or schedule meetings so that they happen when other people are in the room.

If work is triggering stress for you, try taking more frequent breaks from it and setting boundaries to balance how much work you do outside of office hours.

2. Try to avoid the situation that triggers you as much as possible.

This may not always be possible, but sometimes it is. Deal with the stressor head-on rather than avoiding it or hoping that time will fix the problem on its own.

Sometimes just acknowledging a stressful situation and dealing with it can make us feel better. For instance, if you are stressed because of work deadlines, take some steps to make sure you get them done on time.

3. Distract yourself with something else, like listening to music or going for a walk

If you're feeling overwhelmed by stress, it can be helpful to distract yourself from the situation. Sometimes this means literally walking away and doing something else; other times it's about finding a way to make your brain think differently for a while (e.g., reading a magazine article).

Music has been scientifically proven to have a relaxing effect on the body, lowering blood pressure and heart rate. You can also create your own playlist for when you're stressed that includes music that makes you feel good.

Some genres of music that reduce stress include:

  • Classical music (turn on some Mozart to reduce stress)
  • Jazz or easy listening
  • World music like Flamenco, Native American chants and Bali's Gamelan percussion. (Note: these types of music may make you feel more energized rather than relaxed - if that is the case for you, try relaxing piano music.)

4. Practice relaxation techniques such as deep breathing and meditation

Taking five minutes to meditate or do yoga can be a great way to relax and it will help you come back into the situation with more of an open perspective.

Deep breathing and stretching can help clear your mind and relax you. It's one of the most natural methods for reducing stress, so it's worth practising on a regular basis.

Meditation is a great way to increases the flow of oxygen to the brain and heart, improve concentration, focus, memory recall and creativity, reduce anxiety and depression and help people with chronic pain manage their symptoms more effectively.

Here's a simple meditation to get you started:

  1. Sit in a comfortable position and close your eyes.
  2. Notice the sensations of sitting, feeling the chair underneath you or floor beneath your feet. Notice how it feels to breathe naturally without trying to change it in any way (e.g., changing the length or depth of breaths).
  3. Allow thoughts about work, chores, or family to pass through your mind without following them or becoming attached to any of them.
  4. If thoughts do become stuck, just notice this and let the thought go again while still sitting in a comfortable position with your eyes closed.

Try practising meditation for five minutes at a time, especially when you are feeling stressed out - it can be helpful whether you're experiencing stress from work, family or chronic pain.

5. Use medicinal mushrooms to adapt to stress

Our bodies are constantly adapting to our environment through a process called "homeostasis." What does this mean? Our bodies release hormones that make us feel good when we're in danger and feel bad when the stress is over.

Certain mushrooms have been shown to help the body adapt more easily to stress. They do this by increasing serotonin levels, which can make you feel happier and less stressed out!

The medicinal mushrooms found to be most effective for combatting stress are:

  • Lion's Mane - supports the hypothalamus and pituitary gland which help regulate stress response, moods, metabolism, libido and more. Lion's Mane also contains GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps calm anxiety or depressive thoughts.
  • Reishi - increases beta-endorphin production, which can help with stress relief. Reishi also contains monoamines which are chemicals that help transmit signals between nerve cells.
  • Chaga - reduces inflammation and can increase your level of serotonin (which helps regulate moods).
  • Cordyceps - a neuroprotective agent that helps to improve mood and help with fatigue. Cordyceps also increases serotonin levels and can help treat depression.

6. Get enough sleep 

Sometimes, our bodies are in a constant state of stress because we're not getting enough sleep. Restful sleep helps with the body's natural response to stress and can make us less stressed out! Here is why you should get more rest:

  • It increases serotonin levels, which can make you feel happier and less depressed.  
  • Restful sleep helps the body's natural stress response.
  • It is one of the best ways to recharge and rejuvenate your mind, energy, and immune system. 
  • When you're well-rested, it makes dealing with stressful situations a lot easier!

The downsides to not getting enough sleep include:

  • feeling tired, cranky and forgetful - not a good combination!
  • weight gain (due to lack of energy) - that's right, not getting enough sleep can actually make you gain weight!
  • anxiety, depression and trouble focusing - when you're tired, it can make these symptoms worse.

If you're not getting enough sleep, try to make some changes in your habits. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual, such as reading before you go to sleep or taking deep breaths and meditating for five minutes just before going to bed.

It's important to find a nighttime routine that works for you. This includes choosing the right time of day, how much sleep you need (many people need more than eight hours), what types of activities help promote better sleep, and ways to change your environment before bed so it feels like home.

7. Exercise regularly - it can reduce stress by up to 68%!

Regular exercise can have a tremendous impact on stress. It doesn't need to be hard-core—it can be as low-intensity and relaxing as tai chi. The more you exercise, the less stress your body will have to deal with!

Exercise has been shown to reduce stress by up to 68%. It also helps us feel happier and lowers our blood pressure.

In addition, regular exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. It helps reduce stress, improve our moods and it's good for the heart!

8. Talk to others

Talking to others about your worries and concerns can help take the pressure off. This is a great way for other people around us to empathize with our situation, which in turn reduces stress levels! Talking also helps because it might give us new perspectives on how we're feeling or help find solutions that work for everyone involved.

It can be challenging at times, but talking through things in a supportive space will make you feel better and less stressed.

Who to talk to:

  • Friend or family member: Talking to those close to us can help release any pent up feelings. We might feel more at ease and less worried when we talk through our problems with someone who knows what's going on in our life, instead of carrying around the weight all by ourselves!
  • Therapist: A therapist can help you analyze the issues from multiple angles and suggest strategies for handling stressors in a healthy way. This includes talking through things, doing exercises to identify feelings or goals, practicing meditation techniques, etc.

9. Limit alcohol and stimulants

Drinking alcohol or consuming stimulants such as caffeine can make stress worse. Alcohol and other substances can increase the amount of cortisol in your body, which is what makes you feel stressed out!

When we're under a lot of pressure, it's tempting to drink more than usual to deal with our emotions. This often leads to emotional dependence on alcohol. When we drink too much, our stress levels can skyrocket!

In the long-term, alcohol and other substances that increase cortisol can lead to addiction or increased anxiety.

10. Write it down

It's not uncommon for your mind to be so full that you can't think of anything else! When this happens, it's important to write down what is on our minds. It might help us stay organized and clear-headed.

Writing things down helps keep us grounded and decreases stress levels.

Keeping a journal also gives us an outlet to rehash what's happened and reflect on the events.

To get started, braindump all the things that are bothering you in one place, either on your computer or a piece of paper. It might feel strange at first, but it will allow you to take stock of what's going on and see how manageable these issues really are.

Just write whatever you're feeling in the moment. Don't worry about grammar, punctuation or spelling. It's important to stay open with yourself and share what you want, even if it might make us feel embarrassed at first!

11. Laugh

Laughter is one of the best ways to reduce stress. It's important for our bodies and minds to have downtime, so we should make time every day!

It might sound simple, but laughter has a number of benefits: it lowers blood pressure, boosts your immune system, decreases anxiety and can even help you live longer!

Keep your sense of humour and try to laugh at least once a day.

Ways to add laughter to your life:

  • Watch a funny show or movie
  • Read comic strips in the newspaper
  • Watch a stand-up comedy show
  • Spend time with funny friends or family members
  • Play games with friends and family members

When you laugh, your stress levels will lower. It's important to not take life too seriously and to just have fun sometimes!

12. Find the sun

Getting enough sleep is essential for our physical, mental and emotional health. Not only does it help regulate hormones in the brain that affects moods, but it also helps with memory retention and cognitive function!

Lack of sleep can contribute to high-stress levels. A good night's sleep will not only make us feel more rested during the day, but it can also help prevent mood swings and improve cognitive function.

It's especially important to get a decent amount of sleep if you're feeling stressed out or anxious as lack of sleep has been shown to accelerate this process!

How much sleep do we need?

There's no set number for how much sleep one needs, but the average person requires about eight hours of uninterrupted sleep. If you're not getting enough sleep, it can affect our moods and mental health!

Summing it all up

The end of your journey to a less stressful life is in sight. You may be struggling with adapting to stress and finding relief from it, but you are not alone! There are many ways you can adapt that will make your life more manageable, so start practicing these 12 strategies today for the best results possible.

Remember, there is no right or wrong way to react when dealing with stressful situations—just do what works best for you.

Stress is a normal part of life. Stress is the body's way of responding to a stressor or an event that’s threatening, challenging, and difficult. It can lead to anxiety and depression, which in turn can cause more stress.

According to the World Health Organization, "evidence suggests that people under chronic stress are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease." Stress also increases blood pressure levels, making individuals susceptible to heart attack or stroke.

Stress can be caused by deadlines at work, financial troubles, children with behavioural issues or difficult personalities to deal with. It could also stem from a person's lack of self-confidence due to external factors such as their weight or appearance. Some people are naturally more stress-prone than others while some events in life may cause an individual to become more sensitive to stress.

We can't always avoid stressors, but we can adapt to them in healthy and productive ways! In this blog post, you'll learn how to adapt to stress using 12 strategies that are both effective and easy to implement.

 

1. IDENTIFY YOUR TRIGGERS

Figure out what is causing stress for you. Is it a work project? A family member's health issue? An argument with your significant other or friend? Write down the things that trigger stress in your life and see if there are patterns, such as certain days of the week, parts of town where you live, or specific people.

Consider what you can do to lessen the stress of your triggers. For instance, if a particular person stresses you out, avoid spending time with them or schedule meetings so that they happen when other people are in the room.

If work is triggering stress for you, try taking more frequent breaks from it and setting boundaries to balance how much work you do outside of office hours.

 

2. TRY TO AVOID THE SITUATION THAT TRIGGERS YOU AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE

This may not always be possible, but sometimes it is. Deal with the stressor head-on rather than avoiding it or hoping that time will fix the problem on its own.

Sometimes just acknowledging a stressful situation and dealing with it can make us feel better. For instance, if you are stressed because of work deadlines, take some steps to make sure you get them done on time.

 

3. DISTRACT YOURSELF WITH SOMETHING ELSE, LIKE LISTENING TO MUSIC OR GOING FOR A WALK

If you're feeling overwhelmed by stress, it can be helpful to distract yourself from the situation. Sometimes this means literally walking away and doing something else; other times it's about finding a way to make your brain think differently for a while (e.g., reading a magazine article).

Music has been scientifically proven to have a relaxing effect on the body, lowering blood pressure and heart rate. You can also create your own playlist for when you're stressed that includes music that makes you feel good.

SOME GENRES OF MUSIC THAT REDUCE STRESS INCLUDE:

- Classical music (turn on some Mozart to reduce stress)

- Jazz or easy listening

- World music like Flamenco, Native American chants and Bali's Gamelan percussion. (Note: these types of music may make you feel more energized rather than relaxed - if that is the case for you, try relaxing piano music.)

4. PRACTICE RELAXATION TECHNIQUES SUCH AS DEEP BREATHING AND MEDITATION

Taking five minutes to meditate or do yoga can be a great way to relax and it will help you come back into the situation with more of an open perspective.

Deep breathing and stretching can help clear your mind and relax you. It's one of the most natural methods for reducing stress, so it's worth practising on a regular basis.

Meditation is a great way to increases the flow of oxygen to the brain and heart, improve concentration, focus, memory recall and creativity, reduce anxiety and depression and help people with chronic pain manage their symptoms more effectively.

Try practising meditation for five minutes at a time, especially when you are feeling stressed out - it can be helpful whether you're experiencing stress from work, family or chronic pain.

5. USE MEDICINAL MUSHROOMS TO ADAPT TO STRESS

Our bodies are constantly adapting to our environment through a process called "homeostasis." What does this mean? Our bodies release hormones that make us feel good when we're in danger and feel bad when the stress is over.


Certain mushrooms have been shown to help the body adapt more easily to stress. They do this by increasing serotonin levels, which can make you feel happier and less stressed out!

THE MEDICINAL MUSHROOMS FOUND TO BE MOST EFFECTIVE FOR COMBATTING STRESS ARE:

Lion's Mane - supports the hypothalamus and pituitary gland which help regulate stress response, moods, metabolism, libido and more. Lion's Mane also contains GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps calm anxiety or depressive thoughts.

Reishi - increases beta-endorphin production, which can help with stress relief. Reishi also contains monoamines which are chemicals that help transmit signals between nerve cells.

Chaga - reduces inflammation and can increase your level of serotonin (which helps regulate moods).

Cordyceps - a neuroprotective agent that helps to improve mood and help with fatigue. Cordyceps also increases serotonin levels and can help treat depression.

6. GET ENOUGH SLEEP

Sometimes, our bodies are in a constant state of stress because we're not getting enough sleep. Restful sleep helps with the body's natural response to stress and can make us less stressed out!

 

HERE IS WHY YOU SHOULD GET MORE REST:

- It increases serotonin levels, which can make you feel happier and less depressed.  

- Restful sleep helps the body's natural stress response.

- It is one of the best ways to recharge and rejuvenate your mind, energy, and immune system. 

When you're well-rested, it makes dealing with stressful situations a lot easier!


If you're not getting enough sleep, try to make some changes in your habits. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual, such as reading before you go to sleep or taking deep breaths and meditating for five minutes just before going to bed.
 
It's important to find a nighttime routine that works for you. This includes choosing the right time of day, how much sleep you need (many people need more than eight hours), what types of activities help promote better sleep, and ways to change your environment before bed so it feels like home.

7. EXERCISE REGULARLY - IT CAN REDUCE STRESS BY UP TO 68%!

Regular exercise can have a tremendous impact on stress. It doesn't need to be hard-core—it can be as low-intensity and relaxing as tai chi. The more you exercise, the less stress your body will have to deal with!

Exercise has been shown to reduce stress by up to 68%. It also helps us feel happier and lowers our blood pressure.

In addition, regular exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. It helps reduce stress, improve our moods and it's good for the heart!

8. TALK TO OTHERS

Talking to others about your worries and concerns can help take the pressure off. This is a great way for other people around us to empathize with our situation, which in turn reduces stress levels! Talking also helps because it might give us new perspectives on how we're feeling or help find solutions that work for everyone involved.

 

It can be challenging at times, but talking through things in a supportive space will make you feel better and less stressed.

 

WHO TO TALK TO:

Friend or family member: Talking to those close to us can help release any pent up feelings. We might feel more at ease and less worried when we talk through our problems with someone who knows what's going on in our life, instead of carrying around the weight all by ourselves!

 

Therapist: A therapist can help you analyze the issues from multiple angles and suggest strategies for handling stressors in a healthy way. This includes talking through things, doing exercises to identify feelings or goals, practicing meditation techniques, etc.

9. LIMIT ALCOHOL AND STIMULANTS

Drinking alcohol or consuming stimulants such as caffeine can make stress worse. Alcohol and other substances can increase the amount of cortisol in your body, which is what makes you feel stressed out!

When we're under a lot of pressure, it's tempting to drink more than usual to deal with our emotions. This often leads to emotional dependence on alcohol. When we drink too much, our stress levels can skyrocket!

In the long-term, alcohol and other substances that increase cortisol can lead to addiction or increased anxiety.

10. WRITE IT DOWN

It's not uncommon for your mind to be so full that you can't think of anything else! When this happens, it's important to write down what is on our minds. It might help us stay organized and clear-headed.

 

Writing things down helps keep us grounded and decreases stress levels. Keeping a journal also gives us an outlet to rehash what's happened and reflect on the events.
 

To get started, braindump all the things that are bothering you in one place, either on your computer or a piece of paper. It might feel strange at first, but it will allow you to take stock of what's going on and see how manageable these issues really are.
 

Just write whatever you're feeling in the moment. Don't worry about grammar, punctuation or spelling. It's important to stay open with yourself and share what you want, even if it might make us feel embarrassed at first!

11. LAUGH

Laughter is one of the best ways to reduce stress. It's important for our bodies and minds to have downtime, so we should make time every day!

 

It might sound simple, but laughter has a number of benefits: it lowers blood pressure, boosts your immune system, decreases anxiety and can even help you live longer!

 

Keep your sense of humour and try to laugh at least once a day.

 

WAYS TO ADD LAUGHTER TO YOUR LIFE:

- Watch a funny show or movieRead comic strips in the newspaper

- Watch a stand-up comedy show

- Spend time with funny friends or family members

- Play games with friends and family members

 

When you laugh, your stress levels will lower. It's important to not take life too seriously and to just have fun sometimes!

12. FIND THE SUN

Getting enough sleep is essential for our physical, mental and emotional health. Not only does it help regulate hormones in the brain that affects moods, but it also helps with memory retention and cognitive function!

 

Lack of sleep can contribute to high-stress levels. A good night's sleep will not only make us feel more rested during the day, but it can also help prevent mood swings and improve cognitive function.

 

It's especially important to get a decent amount of sleep if you're feeling stressed out or anxious as lack of sleep has been shown to accelerate this process!

 

There's no set number for how much sleep one needs, but the average person requires about eight hours of uninterrupted sleep. If you're not getting enough sleep, it can affect our moods and mental health!

SUMMING IT ALL UP

The end of your journey to a less stressful life is in sight. You may be struggling with adapting to stress and finding relief from it, but you are not alone! There are many ways you can adapt that will make your life more manageable, so start practicing these 12 strategies today for the best results possible.

 

Remember, there is no right or wrong way to react when dealing with stressful situations—just do what works best for you.

Mushrooms To Make Your Day Extraordinary